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Jay | Susan | Alex | Beth | Samantha
July 26, 2009 3:26 am
Published in: Uncategorized

I told our schedulers they could schedule me for flights through the 25th. So they did. I flew up to Akot on the 24th to bring 5 people down to Loki so they could fly on to Nairobi, then on Saturday I brought a plane back to Nairobi for maintenance, with a full load of people and cargo. The weather was good both days, the flights easy, though long. A good way to finish up the term.

We’re packing today and tomorrow and Tuesday we get on the airplane to return to the US. I wish I had something really profound to put on this post but nothing is coming to mind. Despite my lack of profundity, despite a lot of lacks in a lot of areas, God has still allowed us the privilege of serving Him here in Africa for the last 2 1/2 years. I hope we’ve done it well. But whether we have or not, He is the one responsible for the results. Naked we come into this world, naked we will return, blessed be the name of the Lord.

July 18, 2009 5:17 am
Published in: Uncategorized

Well, we moved out of Loki. Susan and the kids flew out on the 10th on the King Air. Alex got to sit up front in the co-pilot seat, which he thought was really cool (I agree!) They all liked the plane…fast, smooth ride, and so on. I drove down over the next two days. The road is…well it’s perhaps the worst road I’ve ever been on. I got into Nairobi on Sunday afternoon. Wednesday, it was back up to Loki! I took 350kg of freight to Werkok and then went to Panyegor to bring 5 people back to Loki to catch a flight. Then Thursday it was up to Yabus, then Malakal and back to Yabus….7 hours of flying. Friday was the return trip, and finally the return to Nairobi, getting back in around 9:30pm. So today it’s rest up.

Yabus, however, was interesting. SIM has a mission there, and they had a number of people coming to see the opening of the Unity Bridge. There’ s a river there, and they’ve just built and opened a cable foot bridge to cross it. There were four tribes there, the names of which I can’t recall, all celebrating the bridge.

July 7, 2009 3:28 am
Published in: Uncategorized

Sunday afternoon, not much going on except relaxing…Jon Hildebrandt our other Loki pilot comes charging over. “Jay you’re doing a medevac from Chotbura to Kurmuk.” Uhh, ok. So we spool up and launch me to Chotbura, 2.7 hours to the north, to get take a lady having a hard time delivering a baby. Initial word is the baby hasn’t survived and the nurses are afraid for the mother.

So we put 400 liters of fuel in the plane, plus a drum to leave at Chotbura plus four 20 liter jerry cans so that I can refuel in Kurmuk and off I go. I land at Chotbura just after 5. Kurmuk is about 50 minutes flight time further north, and sunset is 7:10pm, so still plenty of time as long as we don’t dawdle.

However…. I’m told that the mother is fine, the nurses managed to deliver the baby, who is also fine. So come on over to the compound and we’ll put you up for the night and monitor the mother and child and if necessary you can take them to Kurmuk and the hospital in the morning.

In the morning all is well, so I hop in the plane and head back to Lokichogio. The medevac that wasn’t. Much better than the medevac we were planning.

July 7, 2009 3:28 am
Published in: Uncategorized

Sunday afternoon, not much going on except relaxing…Jon Hildebrandt our other Loki pilot comes charging over. “Jay you’re doing a medevac from Chotbura to Kurmuk.” Uhh, ok. So we spool up and launch me to Chotbura, 2.7 hours to the north, to get take a lady having a hard time delivering a baby. Initial word is the baby hasn’t survived and the nurses are afraid for the mother.

So we put 400 liters of fuel in the plane, plus a drum to leave at Chotbura plus four 20 liter jerry cans so that I can refuel in Kurmuk and off I go. I land at Chotbura just after 5. Kurmuk is about 50 minutes flight time further north, and sunset is 7:10pm, so still plenty of time as long as we don’t dawdle.

However…. I’m told that the mother is fine, the nurses managed to deliver the baby, who is also fine. So come on over to the compound and we’ll put you up for the night and monitor the mother and child and if necessary you can take them to Kurmuk and the hospital in the morning.

In the morning all is well, so I hop in the plane and head back to Lokichogio. The medevac that wasn’t. Much better than the medevac we were planning.